Baby Food Ready

42 Replies
Brittany - December 14

My question is does anyone think it's a bad idea that i'm feeding my 3 month old babyfood/cereal? She's such a little piggy and formula is way to expensive she seems to like the food and she's happier.

 

Narcissus - December 14

Yes, it's a bad idea. Formula is DHA/ARA rich and those are understatedly important for a baby's eye/brain development. They are the building blocks, literally, for her brain. If she is getting the maximum 32 ounces a day, then supplement. Anything less than that, well, she is getting cheated of the proper nutrition. I know nothing about WIC but if you cannot afford formula, you might look into it today.

 

Brittany - December 14

Well I looked into WIC and we make slightly too much. And i'm mixing the cereal w/ her formula. I'm also b___stfeeding but nothing really seems too fill her up to the point where she's happy. Any suggestions? A doctor once told me to judt feed her if she's hungry but thats sooo expensive cause thats all she ever wants to do. Could she just have a fast metabolism like her daddy does? He bigs out ALL day and only weighs 128 and he's 5'9. Always complains he's hungry.

 

Narcissus - December 14

Maybe it's not hunger. Is she crying or just needing some extra stimulation and diversion? Like I said, the max for formula is 32 ounces. There is no limit with b___stmilk. Also, you may try cluster feeding. Some babies eat a little bit all day long. Tally up what she is get_tng for formula in ounces. It will give you a better idea of what to do next.

 

jorden - December 14

My answer...no. Its a personal thing...i started my son on cereal at 2 months...he just ate so much and i asked my doctor and she said she would recommend that i started when he was 4 months but it was up to me...she said it would just fill him up more. And the whole thing with starting them earlier is that they might develop a food allergy...but i chanced it and he did just fine...and he started getting stage 1 baby food at 3 1/2 months...but i think for babies that are bigger or eat more...that its a good idea....my son was almost 11 lbs at birth and it seemed like he was constantly eating...they said about every three hours and it was 1 1/2 for him...thats why i started the cereal ealry....its just a personal thing....GOOD LUCK!

 

Shelly - December 14

I also read yesterday in "parenting" magazine,that starting cereal/solids on babies under 4 months of age can cause besides foodallergies it also increases the chance for them to become diabetic.I had never heard from that before,like i said i read it yesterday.How about buying your baby (as a supplement) Parents Choice formula with DHA/ARA,that stuff is cheap.

 

Toya - December 14

Healthwise...it is not a good idea. It increases her chances of obesity, diabetes, and having cavities. My pediatrician recommended waiting on solids until 6 months of age. Cereal hardly has any fat in it...and as Narcissus said she really needs the DHA and ARA to help her eye and brain development. I b___stfed for 6 months and wish I had gone a year, because formula is VERY expensive!!!!

 

FF - December 14

I know it's tempting to start early, but it's not a good idea. Have you thought about using generic formula? I switched from Enfamil, I'm saving a ton, and my son is doing fine. If you have questions about starting solids, talk to your baby's doctor :)

 

brittany - December 14

where i live the generic costs the same as what i use... right to the penny. and i really want to b___stfeed but i can not i don't make enough milk to make her happy. and yes i've tried everything to try to make more milk. like feeding more often, eatting lots, drinking water. i can't make any.

 

brittany - December 14

just wanted to add i haven't brestfed in about 3 days and i'm not even engorded at all. there actually smaller then usual. its so annoying.

 

to Brittany - December 14

You have to b___stfeed regularly in order to keep your milk supply up. If money is an issue, b___stmilk it the most economical way to go. To get your supply back up nurse all day for a few days. Be sure to drink enough water and feed yourself well. It is important that everything that goes into your babies mouth is full of the proper nutrition. Rice cereal just doesn't provide that for a baby that is so young.

 

Jbear - December 14

I started feeding both of my kids solids early. I started with Valerie because she just ate so much...we got WIC but I still had to buy 4 cans of formula a month, at a time when we were so broke I had no underwear. I started Sophia on solids about 3 weeks ago. She doesn't eat nearly as much as Valerie did, but she was getting so interested in our food that I thought it was time. You can tell when they're ready because they will actually swallow the food, not just push it out with the tongue. I started with cereal, then sweet potatoes and later peaches. I've discovered the whole family likes pureed sweet potato. Oh, about the DHA/ARA in formula, that's a recent thing. When I had Valerie they didn't even have it yet.

 

Kristina - December 14

hmm I'd wait another month...you can start them at 4-6 months..any earlier and their digestive system usually isn't ready.

 

Kristina - December 14

And I think I read that b___stmilk takes around 3 weeks to completly go away...use a pump to get it back! =)

 

TC - December 15

I think that it is a personal decision. There is always some new information that will deter you from doing what you have done in the past. I think that sometimes you have to do what is best for you. Formula is pretty expensive and even though I get WIC, we still have to buy a giant sized can at least once a month to supplement. There are a lot of methods to getting your milk supply to increase but sometimes it just won't happen. I know, I tried. I used to drink water and juice to increase my milk supply and it worked for awhile but then it just stopped. I pumped constantly and could only get about 6oz from each b___st in a day (24hrs). That was not enough for my son. I had to go to formula to supplement and now I just give formula. I stopped trying to pump for about a week and a half now and I too have not been engorged. The DHA/ARA is something that they have added in order to make formula "more like b___stmilk", however, all of the claims of it making a child's brain development better is not really sound information. There are a lot of conflicting information about this, so I personally would not be to worried about it.

 

TC - December 15

Also, I just want to add.... I love Babytalk and all of those other magazines, however, they don't live in my house, they don't know my bills and what I could afford. Sometimes you have to do what is economicly(sp?) sound for you.

 

Narcissus - December 15

TC, I respectfully disagree on the controversy over DHA/ARA and it being good for development. --- COLUMBIA, MD -- April 15, 2005 -- Infant formula supplemented with DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and ARA (arachidonic acid) significantly benefits infant development, according to two new studies. One study showed benefits to visual acuity in term infants, while the other demonstrated enhanced growth and higher Bayley mental and psychomotor development of preterm infants. Both studies used Enfamil Lipil(R) infant formulas from Mead Johnson Nutritionals, which contain levels of DHA and ARA similar to median worldwide amounts reported for b___st milk (0.36% DHA and 0.72% ARA of total fatty acids). The study published in the April 2005 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that term infants fed infant formula supplemented with DHA/ARA during the first year of life demonstrated "clear differences in visual function." The study randomly a__signed 103 term infants to receive either formula supplemented with Martek's DHA and ARA or formula without DHA and ARA (the control group). Visual acuity in the DHA/ARA supplemented group was "significantly better" than the control group each time the infants were tested at 6, 17, 26, and 52 weeks of age. The article notes that the only other large, 12-month study of DHA/ARA supplemented formula measuring visual acuity used a formula with relatively low levels of DHA/ARA and failed to find a functional benefit. The other study published in the April 2005 issue of The Journal of Pediatrics found that infant formula supplemented with DHA and ARA (produced by Martek) resulted in enhanced growth and higher Bayley mental and psychomotor development scores in preterm infants. In this study, 361 preterm infants were randomly a__signed to receive formula without DHA/ARA supplementation (the control group), formula supplemented with Martek's algal- DHA and ARA, or formula supplemented with fish oil-DHA and ARA. The study also used b___st fed term infants as a reference group. The preterm infants fed formula supplemented with Martek's algal-DHA and ARA weighed significantly more than the control group from 66 to 118 weeks PMA (postmenstrual age) and the fish oil-DHA group at 118 weeks. These infants also had weights comparable to the b___st fed term infants in the reference group. In addition, the infants fed formula with Martek's algal-DHA and ARA were significantly longer than the control group at 48, 79, and 92 weeks PMA and the fish-DHA group at 57, 79 and 92 weeks PMA. The groups receiving supplemental DHA and ARA also had higher mental and psychomotor development scores at 118 weeks. Algal-DHA produced by Martek is the only type of DHA currently accepted for use in U.S. infant formulas. "I believe that these findings further support the compelling evidence of the importance of DHA and ARA in infant development. Parents can make sure infants receive an adequate amount of these nutrients by selecting an infant formula with a sufficient level of DHA and ARA. In addition, women who are b___stfeeding can take a DHA dietary supplement to ensure adequate levels of DHA in their b___st milk. This is particularly important because pregnant and nursing women in the U.S. do not typically receive enough DHA through their diets to pa__s on the necessary amount to their developing infants," stated Henry "Pete" Linsert, Jr., Chairman and CEO of Martek.

 

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