Anti Cardiolipin Antibodies Igm Results Any Boday Can Rela

9 Replies
kotkot005 - March 11

well girls i have experianced one miscarriage in 2005, luckily iam pregnant again, but it seems that it is not going fine so far. i have low hcg levels, i do not have any miscarriage symptoms, but as we are anticipating one, my doctor who put me on progestrone since day 1 of ovulation, he ordered me a anti cardiolipin antibodies test, igm.. the results came back with 10. anybody in the same boat can relate to this .. please help.

 

sososleepy - March 11

Hi kotkot. Disclaimer: I am not a medical professional and am not, here or anywhere on this board, writing as one. Does anyone related to you by blood have an autoimmune disease? Did you get a copy of the results or see them? Did they get specific as in IgA, IgC, or IgM? Did it say APL, GPL, or MPL ? If I were you, I'd get a copy of the results (my new habit since my mc: I ask for a copy of all lab results), and then look them up. From what I've found, 10 can be normal depending on which they measured (which is where having a copy of the results helps). Depending on what I found doing the research and my doc's opinion, I'd ask for another blood draw 8 to 10 weeks from the first to quantify my IgA, IgC, & IgM. That's me... most people let their doc be the doc but I find that so hard to do...(bad patient sleepy, bad patient lol) Hang in there kot! Post those results if you get them, you've got me curious.

 

stefkay - March 11

hi! I just had this test done recently too and sososleepy got me curious. I pulled out a copy of mine and it says Test: CardiolipinAb...under that it lists Phospholipid IgM (mine was less than 4 and 10 and up is positive). Under that test it says Phospholipid IgG and I was 4.6...15 and higher is positive on that one. It sounds like a low positive, but I'd still look into what kind of treatment you'd need. I always try to be overly cautious :-) Good luck!

 

LanaK - March 11

Kotkot, I am sorry about your ordeal. Ant-cadiolipin antibody is one of the markers for measuring the status of coagulation in your blood. It is known that women with increased antibody levels may have highter risk of miscarriages than the general population. I was not clear from your post whether this test was done when you were or were not pregnant, since pregnancy itself may affect the results. If it was done when you weren't pregnant, and it's in fact pointing that you are positive for anti-cardiolipin antibody, then your doctor may want you to take an aspirin or another anticoagulant, called, heparin, daily and in your future pregnancies. Do you have any children or just miscarriages? Maybe the aspirin will be "it" for you. Good luck!

 

stefkay - March 11

Lana, I had my test done when I was still pregnant (found out I was going to m/c, but was still very much pregnant)...should I get it done again?

 

sososleepy - March 11

Hey stefkay. I found some good stuff here: standard beginning .sharedjourney.com/define/aca.html It shows the ranges and explains a lot about those results as they relate to fertility and mc.

 

Danni - March 11

Hi Kotkot. I just discovered my ACAs were high after recently having my 3rd mc. Back when I had my first mc in August '06, I had been tested for clotting disorders and only came back with hetero for both MTHFR and 4g5g. ACAs were appeared to be normal, but I also had the test done a month after the mc, which I think affected it. I found a doc who specializes in blood clotting disorders and mc. He does tons of research and knows of new clotting tests that most other doctors don't do. I am currently going through my 3rd mc, but this specialist had me retested for ACAs while I was pregnant, a few weeds ago and sure enough it was high. My number is 20? Don't know what that means exactly, but next time I will be put on heperin at ovulation.

 

LanaK - March 11

stefkay, since your values are negative for anti-cariolipin antibody, you probably don't need to repeat it since it does not matter whether you're pregnant or not if the test is negative. However, if the test is positive during pregnancy, then re-testing when one is not pregnant may be helpful to identify one's baseline state. Pregnancy is a pro-coagulative state in itself due to elevated progesterone and estrogen. If one has an underlining tendency towards clotting disorders when not pregnant (such as positive ACA, etc.), then it's even higher in pregnancy. This is why one is usually given either aspirin or heparin throughout pregnancy - to decrease and prevent thrombotic events, like blood clots in the legs and lungs, and to prevent miscarriage. It's very important to find a specialist - usually a hematologist or a high-risk OB who is familiar with these conditions.

 

stefkay - March 11

yeah, I have MTHFR and the dr. I will see is a high risk ob...I can't see her though until I get pg. She said aspirin was fine but I doubt she'll put me on heparin. I don't really know how the MTHFR works in the whole clotting thing, but I know most of the women who have it are taking aspirin at least, so I figured I'd have to try that at least. I was tested for tons of other thrombophilias, etc. and all came back ok. Thanks!

 

JuJu - March 11

Hi Kotkot005; I also found out that I was positive to ACA's after my second miscarriage last year. The docs think it was the most likely cause of my m/c's - because everything else was fine. I was tested initially about 10 days after my second miscarriage and came up as a medium-level positive for ACA's - they retested me 6 weeks later, and I was still positive but it had dropped to a lower positive. I fell pregnant again in July past year, and they tested my ACA levels again - and they were still a low-positive, so I take 100mg of aspirin every day, to make sure my blood doesn't clot too quickly. If my ACA results had been higher than what they were, I would have been put on Heparin. Luckily for me, the aspirin seems to have done the trick - am now 37+ weeks pregnant and it has been a very good pregnancy! are you seeing a specialist OB or RE? If not, I would recommend that you do; as they tend to know a lot more about these 'ellusive' types of autoimmune disorders. Anyway, good luck .... it's a long road but so worth it!! JuJu

 

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