Molar Pregnancy Please Help

2 Replies
Nikki123 - September 24

This may be a little long but i really need to try and find some answers. I am 27 i have a son age 4 perfectly healthy pregnancy no complications. I went through a divorce, with the new man in my life i got pregnant April of 06 and lost it June 06 they did not do any testing just said no heartbeat and I had D&C. Still with the same guy and got pregnant in July 07 started to bleed 5 days after my positive was told i was about 5 weeks along at the time. I decided since i was bleeding that I would just miscarry naturally. Well it has now been 8 weeks and the bleeding hadnt stopped. Went to the Dr today and my pregnancy test still showed positive. They did an ultrasound and said that they think it is molar and that I will need a D&C asap. I am waiting for the dr to call with my HGC levels but has anyone else experienced this? Do you think that this may be why I lost the first baby? the doctor says its not normal to have this happen and he doesnt think that its related. My diet is horrible and i dont know if that has anything to do with it. Im just afraid that this will keep happening and the guy that I am with is 38 so his baby making years are getting up there so to speak. Im just really worried, and they said that we cant try again for a year.

 

Tory1980 - September 24

Hi Nikki, I actually posted some information on The Cleanslate Thread. It seems diet and also factors to do with the sperm can cause a molar pregnancy. I will copy and paste the information over to here.

 

Tory1980 - September 24

A mole is characterized by a conceptus of hyperplastic trophoblastic tissue attached to the placenta. The conceptus does not contain the inner cell ma__s (the ma__s of cells inside the primordial embryo that will eventually give rise to the fetus). The hydatidiform mole can be of two types: a complete mole, in which the abnormal embryonic tissue is derived from the father only; and a partial mole, in which the abnormal tissue is derived from both parents. Complete moles usually occur when an empty ovum is fertilized by a sperm that then duplicates its own DNA (a process called androgenesis). This explains why most complete moles are of the 46,XX genotype. A 46, XY genotype may occur when 2 sperm (one 23, X and the other 23, Y) fertilize an empty egg. They grossly resemble a bunch of grapes ("cluster of grapes" or "honeycombed uterus" or "snow-storm"[6]). Their DNA is purely paternal in origin (since all chromosomes are derived from the sperm), and is diploid (i.e. there are two copies of every chromosome). Ninety percent are 46,XX, and 10% are 46,XY. In a complete mole, the fetus fails to develop, thus on gross examination there are no signs of fetal tissue. All of the chorionic villi are enlarged. The main complication of the complete mole is a 2% chance of progression to a cancer called choriocarcinoma. Partial moles can occur if a normal haploid ovum is fertilized by two sperm, or, if fertilized by one sperm, if the paternal chromosomes become duplicated. Thus their DNA is both maternal and paternal in origin. They can be triploid (e.g. 69 XXX, 69 XXY) or even tetraploid. Fetal parts are often seen on gross examination. There is also an increased risk of choriocarcinoma, but the risk is lower than with the complete mole. The etiology of this condition is not completely understood. Potential risk factors may include defects in the egg, abnormalities within the uterus, or nutritional deficiencies. Women under 20 or over 40 years of age have a higher risk. Other risk factors include diets low in protein, folic acid, and carotene.Hydatidiform moles should be treated by evacuating the uterus by uterine suction or by surgical curettage as soon as possible after diagnosis. Patients are followed up until their serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) t_tre has fallen to an undetectable level. Invasive or metastatic moles often respond well to methotrexate. The response to treatment is nearly 100%. Patients are advised not to conceive for one year after a molar pregnancy. The chances of having another molar pregnancy are approximately 1%. More than 80% of hydatidiform moles are benign. The outcome after treatment is usually excellent. Close follow-up is essential. Highly effective means of contraception are recommended to avoid pregnancy for at least 6 to 12 months. In 10 to 15% of cases, hydatidiform moles may develop into invasive moles. These may intrude so far into the uterine wall that hemorrhage or other complications develop. It is for this reason that a post-operative full abdominal and chest x-ray will often be requested. In 2 to 3% of cases, hydatidiform moles may develop into choriocarcinoma, which is a malignant, rapidly-growing, and metastatic (spreading) form of cancer. Despite these factors which normally indicate a poor prognosis, the rate of cure after treatment with chemotherapy is high. Over 90% of women with malignant, non-spreading cancer are able to survive and retain their ability to have children. In those with metastatic (spreading) cancer, remission remains at 75 to 85%, although the ability to have children is usually lost

 

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