Echogenic Cardiac Foci

2 Replies
Irina Z - January 8

h__lo ladies... i was just told by the specialist that my baby has echogenic cardiac foci

 

Tan - January 9

Hi. I found some info on echogenic cardiac foci.. and from my own experience. at my 20 week u/s i was told and confirmed by a specialist that our baby has 2 cysts on the brain, and something on the heart, i didnt know the name, but as i was reading the info on this i think it might be the same thing. He was born on Dec 4, 2007. Perfect little child! he was 9 lbs.. and got a perfect apgar score.. he is 100% healthy. so you shouldnt worry about anything. also, hope the info helps. PS-where are you from?

 

Tan - January 9

Echogenic cardiac foci are not an unusual or abnormal finding in an echocardiography of the heart. In fact, up to 7.4% of unborn children have echogenic cardiac foci when the mother is in the second trimester (months 3 to 6). The vast majority of children with echogenic cardiac foci are born normal. This is especially the case for the children of mothers who are under 35 years of age. Only rarely are echogenic cardiac foci a__sociated with birth defects. It has been suggested that the presence of echogenic cardiac foci is a__sociated with a greater risk of the child having Down syndrome. Down's syndrome is an abnormality that is present from birth that results in mental impairments and a characteristic physical appearance (small facial features, large tongue that sticks out, a flat back area of the head, and hands that are short and broad). There is conflicting evidence, however, as to whether echogenic foci in the heart lead to an increased risk for Down syndrome. That is, some studies have found that there is no increased risk whereas others have found that unborn children with echogenic cardiac foci are four times more likely to have Down syndrome. Many studies suggest that unborn children with echogenic cardiac foci have about a 1% chance of having Down syndrome. WHAT CAUSES ECHOGENIC CARDIAC? The formation of calcium or other minerals in the ventricles is what is thought to be the cause of the increased echoing that leads to echogenic cardiac foci. Calcium is a natural element that is very important in bone formation. As evidence of this, a study of the heart tissue of unborn children with Down syndrome found a significantly increased calcification (formation of calcium) in the papillary muscle of the heart. The papillary muscle of the heart is a rounded or cone-shaped type of muscle found in the ventricles of the heart. DO ECHOGENIC CARDIAC FOCI GO AWAY? Yes. Many of the cases of echogenic cardiac foci go away by themselves by the time the child is born. In more than half of the cases, echogenic cardiac foci go away by age 5.

 

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