Induction With 2nd Is Labor Still Long

31 Replies
pepperperson - July 27

Although I see the point that lots of inductions and c-sections are more for convenience than necessity, going past the due date isn't always the best action. My dr feels that when you have a full term baby, there is not much to be gained, but lots to potentially lose by waiting. SOme of these things include the placents becoming less effective at supporting the baby, as well as actaully breaking down, lower fluids, etc. I know not all drs and people look at it this way, but when comparing the pros and cons of inducing a baby who is at full term, with nothing to be gained by waiting except for increased risks, then I guess the induction seems appropriate.

 

mjvdec01 - July 27

My hospital care and stay was wonderful. All I care about is that I have a beautiful, healthy baby boy. How I got there is of no consequence.

 

Justine1 - July 28

Maybe things are different in the US but I live in England and here if there is any danger to the baby as in my first birth you do not get a choice of a natural birth. I had ideally wanted a water birth (though my first and last priority was to have a baby born alive and well) but was told this was not an option - thats the way it is here, the doctors decide here - after all they're the ones with the medical training. I was told my options were c-section or induction, no other options were allowed. I've heard of many home births being cancelled here when complictaions arise beforehand. I said I wanted to avoid c-section unless it was absolutely essential for the baby - thats why the induction took 3 days. There are too many c-sections here but I've never heard to too many inductions and inductions normally take longer than natural births so can't see how it would save time. My second birth was a water birth - you get a choice when the baby's life/health isn't in danger. I would always put my baby's welfare before my desire for a nice birth experience - if I was ever told there was a chance my baby would be harmed by a birth type I wouldn't want to do it. I didn't want an epidural but I don't see anything wrong with wanting one - you normally have pain relief when you go into hospital. I just fancied giving birth in water.

 

Justine1 - July 28

MJVDec01 - Congrats on your baby boy by the way. I agree with you having a healthy child is all that matters.

 

mjvdec01 - July 28

Justine, thank you.

 

ejmeskan - July 28

Hi ladies I just wanted to wanted to comment on one thing. I will do everything i can to not be induced just because I want to go as natural as possible but with that being said- there are VERY few doctors in the US (I don't know about other countries) that will allow a pregnancy to go past 42 weeks- this actually doesn't have anything to do with convenience, it is because the the fetus mortility rate doubles after 42 weeks and is 4-6 times greater after 44 weeks. Everyone has their own perferance on what they want and if they are allow an induction before 42 weeks then that is their decision but once you hit that 42+ week mark it because a medical decision. Congrats on the babe MJ and good luck to everyone else!!!

 

Justine1 - July 28

An induction would only be allowed in England for medical reasons whatever the gestation. In exceptional circ_mstances you could request one after 40 weeks but it would have to be exceptional and I've never heard of it happening. You would normally be induced for being late here I believe at around 41/42 weeks as mortality rates double then but I've never got that far. Induction for being late was certainly around in my Mums generation so its not new here.

 

Franny - July 28

WE ALL OBVIOUSLY WANT HEALTHY BABIES!! That has nothing to do with weather one wants to go all natural or be intervened with. The truth is that nearly 40% of births are intervened with, meaning inducing, sweeping membranes, epidurals, etc. Over 30%!!! YES 30%. Women if anything are more healthy and stronger and have better pre natal care than ever so why on earth is this happening?!?! Check out some statistics about birthing in Holland or on "The Farm" in the USA. On the Farm (sounds silly, but thats the name, google it--Ina May Gaskin) in over 2000 births less than 3% had any kind of intervention and less than 2% ended in c-section! The entire philosophy of giving birth there is that the women has the power, strength, and knowledge and when she believes this changes are far far greater she will birth on her own. Doctors nowdays don't even know how to deliver a breech baby or twins or let a women labor for more than 20 hours....Call your local hospital and ask for their stats....you would be amazed. Me, I had one miserable hospital birth and decided to have my next 2 at home. Anyway, to each their own.

 

Franny - July 28

CORRECTION: 30%

 

ejmeskan - July 28

Yikes Franny- those are crazy numbers. My doctor actually won't induce unless it is medically needed or if you are past 42 weeks. Otherwise he just won't do it even if it is subsequent pregnancy. Sorry to hear about your bad hospital experience!

 

Justine1 - July 28

Franny - Try looking up the rates of stillbirth in the good old days when it was all natural - 1 in 10 here. Both my grandmothers had stillborns - that was normal then. Safety will always come first for me and I trust my doctor.

 

lisa mc - July 28

hi thought i would add to this. i live in scotland uk and here you have to go 2 weeks overdue before they will induce which i totally disagree with from experience with a friend not myself. i had my first child 2 days late and she weighed 7lb 12 ozs and had my second 1 day late weighing 10lb 12ozs both girls. my friend went 14 days late she was monitored every 2 days throught that 2 weeks she went overdue and the day she went into hospital to be induced she was told her baby had died. if the doctors had induced her when she was due or even a week late she would of had a prfectly healthy baby girl but saddly that didnt happen and she had to give birth knowing that she would never get the chance to nurse her. she had to go through 9 months of carrying a perfectly healthy child and a 14hr labour to have to say hello and goodbye all in the space of a couple of minutes. this all could of been avoided if she was induced.

 

Franny - July 28

Justine1, EXACTLY, you proved my point! (Though you tried to disprove it!) The stillbirth rate has been reduced dramatically since the 1950s with the introduction of interventions for diabetes, preeclampsia, and Rh isoimmunization. WHY?!?! Because we have awesome prenatal care!! THEREFORE a natural birth at home is as safe... if not safer than a hospital birth. For example any intervention comes with a risk. Risks that you will not come across in a natural birth. Do a bit of digging on the internet and see what you come up with. Safety comes first for me too : )!!

 

Justine1 - July 28

Franny - I have looked on the internet though I'll have to stop now as I've got 2 small monkeys to look after! From what I can see even in the Netherlands there are C-sections (10%) was the figure I could find and any complicated birth is done in hospital. I think there are too many C-sections here and in the US (I would guess the threat of being sued boosts the US figure - thats the perception here). Don't know about inductions - only figures I could find say it was 20% in 1980 and 20% now and I've never heard anything to say thats too many. I think some C-sections save babies lifes and mothers lifes. Home births here are rare (2%) and the only person I know with a child who was brain damaged had one and they told her if she'ld given birth in hospital he would have been fine. There is a huge shortage of midwives here and you are only allowed to give birth at home if you are low risk. If you insist on a home birth you may not get a midwife at all in many places here - you'ld either give birth alone (which I think would be crazy) or go into hospital. I think if you are close to a hospital and your country has a lot of midwives and you have had no complications in pregnancy then you can have a home birth if thats what you'ld want. I never wanted a home birth and when I was told my baby was at risk unless I had an induction or c-section I trusted the doctors. I wasn't allowed to do otherwise anyway! Anyway think we'll have to agree to disagree on whether C-sections and inductions save lives or not. I've got to go but I'm sure you and I only want the best for our children its just we think differently.

 

Justine1 - July 28

Lisa - I'm so sorry about your friends baby, it must be so awful to go through a stillbirth esp. when you know if the doctors had intervened earlier she'ld have her baby.

 

Mama bear - February 23

I originally was very against getting induced the first time and felt a similar way, however I'm really thankful they made me induce when I was two weeks late because my baby was already 10lbs and they had to break his collar bone to get him out...(26hr labor)and we both almost didn't make it. My little one was in NICU for a week. I was having no signs of contractions or any other indication that he was coming anytime soon on his own. My belly hadn't "dropped" and I hadn't dialated and felt no contractions or even Braxton hicks. I'm grateful I didn't wait any longer and have an 11lb or 12lb baby and need an emergency C section. We have very large babies in my family and my feelings have completely changed. I want healthiest and safest time frame for baby if my body isn't getting there on its own. 

 

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