If Your Worried About Bleeding Read This

2 Replies
clare - June 13

hi girls i hope this helps you if you are worried about bleeding i no i was when it happened to me in 1st tri. xx---Is my baby at risk? If you start to bleed in pregnancy it’s natural to panic, but there are various reasons why it might happen and it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to lose your baby. Midwife Claire Friars, who runs the pregnancy information line for Tommy’s the baby charity, says, ‘We get calls all the time from women worried about bleeding. It’s frightening when it happens to you. ‘A bit of spotting in early pregnancy is very common but that doesn’t make it any less worrying. At this stage the majority of women haven’t told anyone and haven’t got a midwife so they don’t know where to go or what to do.’ Up to one in four women bleed at some time in pregnancy. It’s especially common in the first three months. But the good news is that of the women who do bleed in early pregnancy, which is when most miscarriages occur, a reassuring 75% go on to have healthy babies. If you start bleeding, tell your GP or midwife straight away. You’ll be asked questions about the type of bleeding you’re experiencing as well as details about your pregnancy and medical history. This will help work out the cause and the help you may need. Claire says, ‘Many hospitals now have an early pregnancy unit where you can have an ultrasound. In some areas you can refer yourself to the antenatal clinic at the hospital but in other areas you have to get a referral from your GP – if this is the case you should make an emergency appointment. If it’s the middle of the night, it’s difficult to know where to turn. If the bleeding’s heavy enough to wear a pad, go straight to A&E. Often though, it’s just a few spots and going to A&E may seem over the top. It’s quite common to get a few spots of blood when your period would have been due or when the egg attaches itself to the wall of the womb. If it’s very light you can probably wait until morning. ‘But if you need reassurance or if the spotting is accompanied by pain, ring the midwife on your hospital labour ward immediately,’ says Claire. It’s likely the cause will turn out to be something minor, such as implantation bleeding (see over) so although it’s not easy, try to stay calm. HEATHER HUGHES, 34, from Gloucester, has two sons, Nye, 16 months, and Aedan, 3. ‘I was 8 weeks pregnant when I noticed dark red spotting. I rang my GP who made me an appointment at the hospital’s early pregnancy unit for the next day. ‘At the unit I had an internal scan and I prayed it would be okay. When the woman doing the scan pointed out the baby’s heartbeat I was laughing and crying with joy. ‘We were told the pregnancy sac had come away and left a bruise on the womb, which was shedding dried blood cells. ‘The bleeding lasted for five days but it was a relief to know what it was. Aedan was born a perfectly healthy baby.’

 

clare - June 13

sorry i found another part to it lol i know its a long post but it will help you no whats going on xx ---- WHAT YOU'LL NOTICE Light reddish-brown spotting, in some cases after s_x WHAT IT COULD BE Breakthrough bleeding: can happen when your period would be due. Implantation bleeding: when the egg attaches to the womb wall. Cervical erosion: hormones can affect the cervix. WHAT TO DO Contact your midwife or GP. If the bleeding is light and you’re not in pain, it’s probably nothing to worry about. WHAT YOU'LL NOTICE Dark red or dark brown blood. There may also be abdominal pain, often just on one side. WHAT IT COULD BE Ectopic pregnancy. This is a rare but serious condition that happens when the fertilised egg implants itself outside the uterus, usually in one of the Fallopian tubes. WHAT TO DO Contact your GP immediately. The growing embryo will eventually rupture the Fallopian tube, which can be life threatening to you. Surgery is needed to remove the embryo. WHAT YOU'LL NOTICE Steady bleeding ranging from a light brown discharge to heavy red blood with clots and period-like pain. WHAT IT COULD BE Threatened miscarriage. In most cases the bleeding will stop and the pregnancy will continue as normal. WHAT TO DO Call your midwife or GP. You may be offered a scan to check things are OK. If you lose the baby, you may need surgery to clear your uterus, which is called dilation and curettage or D&C.

 

babymama06 - June 13

No one said anything about your post but I found it very helpful...I bled only once after masturbation for one to two wipes and that was it, but having had something like this when in need would have been very helpful...Thanks again...

 

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