Q S On BREASTFEEDING Advice Welcomed

10 Replies
Mandy1984 - June 8

Ok, I have loads of Questions on B--tfeeding as I have been thinking about it more and more. .1. AFTER THE BIRTH, IT CAN TAKE 3 DAYS FOR ACTUAL B.MILK TO COME IN, WOULD MY BODY MAKE ENOUGH COLUSTRUM (sp?) TO FEED MY BABY???*** .2. WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON'T PRODUCE ENOUGH COLSTRUM IN THE FIRST FEW DAYS AND BABY IS STILL HUNGRY? DO I SUB WITH A BOTTLE? *** .3. HOW DOES A PUMP WORK? IS IT JUST SUCTION? *** .4. DOES THE PUMP ATTACH TO YOUR NIPLE OR WHOLE b ___st?? **5. HOW DO I KNOW HOW MUCH BABY HAS GOT??? ***6... I AM HAVING A PLANNED C.SECTION AT 37-38WEEKS, WILL THERE BE ENOUGH COLUSTRUM FOR THE FIRST FEW DAYS?? Thanks in advance

 

Taffy - June 8

This is purely what I know as a scientist and not from experience. I can't answer all your questions but I might be able to help with some. Your body is usually capable of producing colostrum from about 16 weeks gestation so yes you should be able to produce it even if you don't go full term. The other one I can answer is how much the baby will need in the first few days after birth. Again scientifically, babies are born with brown fat that nourishes them for the first few days until it runs out so they don't need to feed. The colostrum not only contains antibodies but also stimulates your babies gut to clear itself and prepare for normal feeding. As far as Im aware you only need small amounts of colostrum to do this. As I said I haven't yet been through it myself so if you are worried the best thing you can do is to ask your Dr. I hope this gives you at least a starting point for your questions.

 

shortcake - June 8

I had an emergancy c-section. I was out of it after my surgery. My c-section was at 12:55am it wasn't until about 8am that morning that they gave me a pump to start trying to get something out to bring to my baby who was in the NICU. I think they had me try pumping every 3 hours that day maybe more so and I believe at the end of the day I was able to get a very small trace amount of colustrum. We're talking like maybe an eye dropper full lol! The next day I was able to get a little more--maybe half an ounce. It wasn't until like you said about 3 or 4 days later that I was pumping so much that I'd have to stop in the middle to pour out the milk so I could continue to pump more until I was drained. If you can't produce much they supply baby with a very superb formula--thats what they did for us. The pump suction thing has a cone thats attached to a small vile/bottle and tubes coming out of the bottle that attach to the machine to help with the suction. The cone part has a hole where the nipple fits in and the cone basically goes around half of the b___st. Here's a link to the ones they had at my hospital to give you an idea of how it looks or will fit. http://www.gentlepump.com/images/medela_cla__sic.jpg

 

San_dee - June 8

for me my milk came in on day 2, but from what the nurses told me the colostrum is just for antibodies and clearing their bowls like taffy said, its normal for the baby to lose a bit of weight in the first few days, i remember my DS got back up to his birth weight 1week after he was born. you will b___stfeed quite a bit even though your not producing any milk yet, thats to stimulate all the milk glads so your body knows when and how much milk to make. but in saying that when my milk came through my b___sts were the size of melons, was so engorged that the hospital staff gave me frozen nappies to put on my b___sts. lol

 

olivia - June 8

Hi Mandy, My milk came in on day 4 after my emergency c-section. My baby did not eat for her first 24 hours (the nurses said she was still throwing up fluid and did not need to eat yet). I fed her for the first time about 30 hours after she was born and she latched on and was getting colestrum. She was spitting it up so they knew she was getting some. She was fine with just colostrum until my milk came in on day 4. She lost about 8oz before we were discharged but gained it all back plus some in one week. The colostrum will be perfect for your baby even if it takes 3-4 days for your milk to come in. If you are having a lot of trouble with latching and getting started the nurses may suggest trying a bottle. Try to resist unless necessary if you are really set on b___stfeeding. Even if your baby looses some weight the first few days, it will catch up and not starve nursing and feeding on colostrum. As for the other questions -- the pump is suction, you squeeze which applies pressure, and your milk basically just squirts out. It covers your nipple and part of your b___st (sort of like a funnel with suction). The baby will stop eating when it is done, you will know it is eating enough when you visit the doctors and are told your baby is gaining weight. If the baby starts loosing weight after your milk is established they may not be getting enough. Another good way to tell is after a week if the poop is yellow and seedy the baby is getting enough, if it is green it needs to eat longer. Hope this helps, you can find good info at kellymom.com or laleche.org

 

Susan W - June 9

My milk came in at 2.5 days. I literally started to nurse on the bed I delivered on when my baby was just a few minutes old because my midwife hoped it would slow my blood loss, but there was no stemming that flow, and then was transferred to surgery to save my life, so DS didn't nurse for about 6 hours while I was in surgery. Until your milk comes in, the BEST thing to do is simply nurse, nurse, nurse. That builds your supply and brings in your milk faster. Nursing is much, much more efficient than a pump. Colostrum is very nutrient rich and more than enough for most babies. I say most, as mine was not content with colostrum for the first few days :( and someone gave him a bottle there at the hospital, and boy, did that screw up nursing for just about the first 8 weeks :(( The baby nurses to satiety, and that means you will feel like all you do is nurse for the first 6 weeks. Just go with it. It's what is supposed to happen. Lots of frequent nursing will also help you avoid engorgement. And if you are engorged, don't pump. I made that mistake, which told my body to make even more milk, and I literally was throwing out at least 8 oz per b___st at each pumping (which was every 2 hours!). And seriously, go to a La Leche League meeting NOW, before the baby comes, and you can have many questions you have answered, and some you didn't think of, before you run into those problems. You can also go to the lalecheleague.org message board and ask questions of leaders and nursing moms. I must warn you that nursing is far from easy, but it has been well worth it, and I've been nursing a long, long time now. . . . Do NOT ask doctors for advice on nursing. Most have NO training in it and have many false ideas about it. The best thing to do is line up a contact in your local LLL and a lactation consultant before the baby comes. Ask if you have more questions; like I said, I've been nursing a very long time and have probably had every problem in the book over the last couple of years, lol!

 

Jamie - June 10

I had an emergency c-section at 37 weeks. My daughter was born on Wednesday, my milk came in on Friday. Colostrum will be enough for your baby until your milk comes in. You can tell how much your baby has eaten based on the number of wet/poopy diapers.

 

Mandy1984 - June 11

Hey, thanks for all your advise, You all make it sound so easy, I hope I can cope as well as all of you have. This will be my 3 rd baby but the other 2 were bottlefed so I am new at B.Feeding... When a baby is born does it already just know how to suck? With my 1st c.section I was put under a general anesthetic and when I woke my daughter had already been given a bottle, same with my 2nd I was not the first person to give her a bottle so I am unsure if they already just 'know' how to suck? After the birth, does someone show you, or put baby to the b___st for you? This may sound strange but I think I would rather try myself with no-one looking, if I had any problems i would ask for help, but I almost feel slightly embarra__sed. B.Feeding is really not as common in N.Ireland, well if it is its not 'spoke' of that often. The only time I have ever seen a baby being B.Fed is in the hospital when I had my other girls....

 

olivia - June 11

Your baby will know how to suck, sometimes getting the correct latch is the hard part. Some babies are better at it than others too. Before your surgery I would talk to the nurses and let them know you want to b___stfeed. Maybe one of them did and can help you out, otherwise, go ahead and try by yourself. The babies belly should be against your belly, or using the football hold the baby seems to be sort of sitting up under your arm. Just make sure his/her neck is not turned at all. Your baby will root around when hungry (little sucky faces). Day 3 was the most difficult for me, the first day the baby wants to suck all day. Actually, the first 6 weeks are hard, but you'll get the hang of it. I was shy about it too, but the nurses were helpful when I did have questions. They don't sit there and watch you feed the baby, but they may help you get started. Traditionally women have been taught to b___stfeed by other women, not to say you and your baby can't figure it out on your own. But ask questions here, and get a good book about b___stfeeding and read it before you go to deliver. Good luck!

 

Susan W - June 11

If there is a La Leche League near you, I would highly recommend going before the baby is born, and many of the women there can teach you to nurse if that's not an option in the hospital. I know LLL is worldwide, but I'm not sure about a group in Ireland. LLL also has a message board you can visit and ask questions on. . . . Nobody showed me the first time I nursed, which was literally while I was still where I delivered my baby. He just latched on. Granted, my midwife, husband, two friends and my mom were there, but after what they had just gone through with me, worrying about being embarra__sed was the last thing on my mind. I only got embarra__sed later, and that lasted until I realized this was normal and if someone didn't like it, that was their problem. Nursing got harder to actually do after someone gave him just one bottle, and we had a really hard time getting nursing established as a result., so I would make my desire to nurse very clear -- I've even heard of moms putting signs in the ba__sinet, if they aren't rooming in, to make sure nobody gives the baby formula or sugar water. . . . There are LOTS of good b___stfeeding books, which may also help . . .LLL has an extensive sale catalog, or you may see what's around locally. . . .The biggest obstacle to overcome is YOU. If you are determined to make it work, you can. It may take time -- nursing is a skill you have to learn, and the baby is learning at the same time -- but you can do it.

 

San_dee - June 11

the midwife stuck DS on the b___st about 2 mins after he was born and he latched on strait away, i was too worried about all this but he knew what to do from the get go, i remember feeling super exhausted after 22hrs of labour and the midwife stuck a pillow on my knees and the baby on the pillow grabbed my brest and put it in DS mouth, i didnt even click what was going on till about 10 mins later.. so try not to worry it does all come naturally.

 

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